Turtledove
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The Wolf
WolfITW1987.jpg
Robert Westenberg in Broadway's Into the Woods, c. 1987
Characters Adapted from Other Works
First Appearance: "Little Red Riding Hood" (original story, unnamed);
Into the Woods (relevant stage adaptation)
Creator: Unknown (original);
Stephen Sondheim and James Lapine (play)
Species: Werewolf or sentient wolf (Canis lupus), depending on the telling
Cause of Death: Cut in half with an axe
Appearing in:


"The Great White Way"
by Laura Frankos

Set in OTL
Type of Appearance: Direct
Species: VR avatar
Cause of Death: Burned to death
Military Branch: Sondheads

The Wolf, also called The Big Bad Wolf, is the antagonist in the medieval European fairy tale "Little Red Riding Hood." Usually depicted as either a sentient bipedal wolf or a human-wolf hybrid, the Wolf is initially seen by Red as a harmless friendly ally, before turning on her and her grandmother with human-eating (metaphorically paedophilic) intentions.

The Wolf is a secondary antagonist in the Stephen Sondheim play Into the Woods. His role faithfully adheres to the original story, and his aria "Hello Little Girl" emphasizes the metaphor of paedophilia.

The Wolf in "The Great White Way"[]

The Wolf was an important Sondhead champion in the first round of the Sondheim-Webber battle. Teaming in a unit with Count Carl-Magnus Malcolm and the samurai squad patrolling his native Woods, the Wolf ate the Webberite warrior Jennyanydots. However, he was subsequently killed in a flame-throwing ambush by Magical Mr. Mistoffelees.

Jack and The Witch from the same play also took part in the battle.

The Wolf in Earthgrip[]

In her dealings with the Foitani, Professor Jennifer Logan frequently compared (in her own mind) their appearances and personalities to the Big Bad Wolf of folklore. Several times in her ordeal, she expected that one or another of them would say "the better to see you with, my dear," "the better to smell you with, my dear," "the better to hear you with, my dear," etc., right up to "the better to eat you with, my dear."

References[]

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