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Viviane
Fictional Character
Clever Rolf Stories
Fantasy
Appearance(s): "Blue Fox and Werewolf";
"Mebodes' Fly"
Type of Appearance: Direct
Nationality: Argentan
Spouse: Clever Rolf (common-law)

Viviane, a fair maiden, was kidnapped by the evil wizard Mebodes and imprisoned in a tower in the Great Wood, surrounded by werewolves. While a number of knights failed to penetrate the wizards' safeguards, an accountant named Clever Rolf used silver ket to defeat the werewolves and rescue Viviane. Later the next day, he found the clearing where Viviane resided. In gratitude, she cooked him a meal fit for three men. Mebodes' treasure turned out to be brass, and Viviane was not as beautiful as the stories claimed. She also talked too much, and was not a "maiden". Still, Clever Rolf took her home, though he threatened to leave her with Medodes if she didn't stop speaking.[1]

Clever Rolf and Viviane began living together, but their personalities were incompatible. While Clever Rolf was off at a local jollyhouse, Mebodes tracked him down and put a curse on him. The wizard's presence in their town was also very distressing to Viviane, as was the curse, which involved numerous insect attacks, culminating in a swarm of ants in their bed. While they stood naked by the river ridding themselves of the ants, Viviane Viviane exclaimed that Mebodes was so awful that even other wizards hated him, Clever Rolf saw the solution to his problems, and tracked down the wizard Rigord.[2]

Clever Rolf secured the aid of another wizard, Rigord, who drove Mebodes off with a salamander while he was with Aila, Clever Rolf's favorite whore at the bawdy house. She thanked Clever Rolf with a free visit. Clever Rolf told her the hold story, minimizing Viviane's role in defeating Mebodes.[3]

Literary comment[]

Viviane's final fate is unknown, as she is never mentioned in "The Talking Cat".

References[]

  1. Amazing Stories, vol 57, no. 3, September 1983, pg. 119-123.
  2. Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, vol 83, no 1, July 1992, pg. 96-101
  3. Ibid., pgs. 101-106.
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