Turtledove
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Guinevere
Guinevere.jpg
Arthurian Legends Character
First Appearance: Oral Tradition; Historia Regum Britanniae
Nationality: Britannia
Religion: Christianity
Occupation: Royalty
Spouse: King Arthur
Turtledove Appearances:
"A Massachusetts Yankee in King Arthur's Court"
Set in OTL
Type of Appearance: Direct

Guinevere (/ˈɡwɪnɪvɪər/GWIN-iv-eer; Welsh: Gwenhwyfar; Breton: Gwenivar), often written as Guenevere or Guenever, is the wife and queen of King Arthur in the Arthurian legend. Guinevere has been portrayed as everything from a villainous and opportunistic traitor to a fatally flawed but noble and virtuous lady. She has first appeared in Geoffrey of Monmouth's Historia Regum Britanniae, a pseudo-historical chronicle of British history written in the early 12th century, and continues to be a popular character in the modern adaptations of the legend.

In the later medieval romances, one of the most prominent story arcs is Queen Guinevere's tragic love affair with her husband's chief knight and friend, Lancelot, indirectly causing the death of Arthur and many others and the downfall of the kingdom. This story first appeared in Chrétien de Troyes's Lancelot, the Knight of the Cart and became a major motif in the Lancelot-Grail of the 13th century, carrying through the Post-Vulgate Cycle and Thomas Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur.

Guinevere in "A Massachusetts Yankee in King Arthur's Court"[]

Queen Guinevere was the only thing in Cam'lod'n that John F. Kennedy found resembled the romanticized Arthurian legend. Kennedy immediately decided he'd try to lay her. She was receptive, and arranged a tour of the castle, until they were able to find a private moment.

While in mid-act, Merlin entered the room to announce he found a way for Kennedy to return home. When Merlin, horrified by what he was seeing, attempted to refuse to help Kennedy, Guinevere intervened, ordering Merlin to help Kennedy, and promising that if he didn't, she'd tell Arthur that Merlin had touched her inappropriately. Merlin relented, and sent Kennedy home.

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