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Battle of Britain
Part of World War II
Date 10 July – 31 October 1940
Location United Kingdom airspace
Result Decisive British victory
Belligerents
Britain United Kingdom

Incorporated Air Forces
RepublicPolandFlag Poland
NewZealand New Zealand
Dominion Canada Canada
Czech Czechoslovakia
Australia Australia
Others

Nazi Germany Flag Germany
Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg Italy
Commanders and leaders
800px-Ensign of the Royal Air Force.svg Hugh Dowding

800px-Ensign of the Royal Air Force.svg Keith Park
800px-Ensign of the Royal Air Force.svg Trafford Leigh-Mallory
800px-Ensign of the Royal Air Force.svg Leigh-Mallory
800px-Ensign of the Royal Air Force.svg CJ Quintin Brand
800px-Ensign of the Royal Air Force.svg Richard Saul

300px-Roundel of the German Air Force border.svg Hermann Göring

300px-Roundel of the German Air Force border.svg Albert Kesselring
300px-Roundel of the German Air Force border.svg Hugo Sperrle
300px-Roundel of the German Air Force border.svg Hans-Jürgen Stumpff
600px-Italy-Royal-Airforce.svg Rino Corso Fougier

The Battle of Britain is the name given to the Second World War air campaign waged by the Luftwaffe against the United Kingdom during the summer and autumn of 1940. The objective of the campaign was to gain air superiority over the Royal Air Force.

The Battle of Britain was the first major campaign to be fought entirely by air forces, and was also the largest and most sustained aerial bombing campaign to that date. The failure of Germany to achieve its objectives of destroying Britain's air defences, or forcing Britain to negotiate an armistice or an outright surrender, is considered its first major defeat and one of the crucial turning points in the war.

Battle of Britain in In the Presence of Mine EnemiesEdit

The Battle of Britain resulted in victory for the Luftwaffe, allowing the German Army to successfully invade and conquer Britain. Memorabilia from the battle were placed on display in the Soldier's Hall in Berlin.

Battle of Britain in WorldwarEdit

The Battle of Britain was still remembered by aircrews of the RAF, as their defining moment, which was overshadowed by the Race's Invasion of Britain in 1943. Although the Spitfire had shot to fame during the battle, many RAF pilots thought it unfair that the Hurricane was forgotten as it had done a lot of fighting too.

ReferencesEdit

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